Iron Deficiency Anemia & Women's Health Conditions

About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has IDA

Women of childbearing age are at a higher risk for developing IDA due to blood loss during long or abnormally heavy menstrual periods, or bleeding fibroids, which are non-cancerous growths in or on the uterus. Blood loss during childbirth can also cause low levels of iron in women.

Mild to moderate IDA may have no signs or symptoms, but as it progresses, IDA can cause fatigue, shortness of breath, chest pain, headache, dizziness or brittle nails. In certain rare instances, severe IDA may also lead to heart problems, infections and depression.

About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has IDA

Carrie Ann's Story

Carrie Ann's Story

Carrie Ann Inaba is known as an upbeat TV host, producer, choreographer and dancer. Several years ago, she started feeling intense fatigue, pain and brain fog. Unable to figure out what was causing her to feel so debilitated, she decided to consult her doctor. Her lab work showed that her hemoglobin and ferritin levels were too low, meaning she had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Her doctor determined that her fibroids, a common cause of IDA in patients, were the source of her condition.

Since her diagnosis, Carrie Ann has worked with her doctor to determine a treatment plan to manage her IDA and iron levels, which has been essential for maintaining her overall health.

Getting tested for IDA may help make sure your women's health condition isn’t adversely affecting your iron levels and impacting your health.

Diagnosing & Treating IDA

Unsure how to discuss IDA with your doctor?

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